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IAR-93


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Schultz #1 Posted 01 December 2011 - 07:46 PM

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IAR-93



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IAR-93 "Vultur" (Eagle) is a twin-engine, subsonic, close support, ground attack and tactical reconnaissance aircraft with secondary capability as low level interceptor, built as single-seat main attack version or combat capable two-seat version for advanced flying and weapon training. It was developed as a joint Yugoslav-Romanian project in the 1970s for the air forces of both nations. The Romanian aircraft were built by I.R.Av. Craiova as IAR-93, and its Yugoslav counterpart by Soko as the Soko J-22 Orao. For Romania, the IAR-93 was intended to replace MiG-15s and MiG-17s in the fighter-bomber role.

Development

On May 20, 1971, Romania and Yugoslavia signed the governmental agreements for the YuRom R&D programme. The program managers were Dipl. Dr. Engineer Teodor Zamfirescu for the Romanian party and Colonel Vidoje Knezevic for the Yugoslav party.

The requirements called for a light subsonic aircraft for ground attack and tactical reconnaissance missions and with low level air combat as a secondary capability. It was to be built on a simple structure, using locally produced equipment and avionics (but compatible with western components), tough (able to operate on grass or damaged runways), easy to maintain and reliable. The aircraft was of conventional twin-engine, high mounted wing monoplane configuration with all flying surfaces swept. The Rolls-Royce Viper was chosen as the powerplant, as Soko had experience with licence-building this engine. It was originally intended that an afterburner would be developed for the Viper engines, but there were prolonged difficulties with this project, meaning that none of the pre-production aircraft featured it, and neither did early production examples. During the 1980s, both countries developed slightly different versions to take advantage of the afterburning engines that had since become available.

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Flight testing

The Romanian single-seat prototype White 001 made its first flight which lasted 21 minutes on October 31, 1974 at Bacău (simultaneously with the Yugoslav prototype at Batajnica Air Base). The aircraft was flown by Colonel Gheorghe Stănică. On September 20, 1979 the plane was lost when, during a test flight both engines stopped and the pilot ejected. This prompted modifications to the combustion chamber (including all aircraft already delivered).

On July 18, 1975 the aircraft was presented to Nicolae Ceauşescu on the Bacău airfield.
The DC (two-seat) prototype #003 first flew on January 23, 1977, and was lost on November 24, 1977 due to tail flutter. The left elevator broke off while in level flight at 500 m altitude and 1,045 km/h. The Martin-Baker Mk RU10J zero-zero ejection seats functioned well and the two test pilots ejected safely. After this event the aft fuselage structure was reinforced.
Prototype #004 crashed at Craiova Air Base on February 20, 1979 during an aerobatics demonstration. The pilot, Capt. Eng. Dobre Stan didn't manage to eject.
On August 23, 1979 three IAR-93 (#001, #002 and #005) were first presented to the public in flight during the military parade celebrating the national day of Romania at that time.

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Variants
-IAR-93A: initial production version with non-afterburning Viper Mk 632-41 turbojets
          15 pre-production aircraft delivered in 1979; entered service in 1981
          26 built (#109-119 pre-production, #150-164 series) as single-seaters and 9 DC (two-seat) trainers (#005-008 pre-production, #180-184 series)
-IAR-93MB: MB = Motor de Baza (basic engine). This version had the fuselage of the IAR-93B but used the non-afterburning engine of the IAR-93A
          delivered starting with 1982
           15 single-seaters built (#201-215)
-IAR-93B: refined version with afterburning Viper Mk 633-47 engines, increased internal fuel capacity, upgraded hardpoints and revised wing, including leading edge extensions.

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Specifications (IAR-93B)


General characteristics

    Crew: 1
    Payload: 2,500 kg (5,512 lb)
    Length: 14.90 m (48 ft 10 in)
    Wingspan: 9.30 m (30 ft 6 in)
    Height: 4.52 m (14 ft 10 in)
    Wing area: 26.0 m² (280 ft²)
    Airfoil: NACA 65A-008 (modified)
    Empty weight: 5,750 kg (12,676 lb)
    Max takeoff weight: 10,900 kg (22,030 lb)
    Powerplant: 2 × Turbomecanica/Orao-built Rolls-Royce Viper Mk 633-47 afterburning turbojets
        Dry thrust: 17.79 kN (4,000 lbf) each
        Thrust with afterburner: 22.24 kN (5,000 lbf) each

Performance

-Maximum speed: 1,089 km/h (680 mph)
-Cruise speed: 1,086 km/h (675 mph)
-Stall speed: 274 km/h (171 mph)
-Range: 1,320 km (825 miles)
-Service ceiling: 13,600 m (44,608 ft)
-Rate of climb: 3,900 m/min (12,800 ft/min)
-Wing loading: 419.2 kg/m² (85.9 lb/ft²)

Armament

-2 x 23 mm GSh-23L twin-barrel cannon in lower front fuselage, below engine air intakes, with 200 rds/gun; gun camera and GEC-Marconi D282 gyro gunsight
    up to 2,500 kg (5,511 lb) on 5 pylons

-BM 500 bomb
-BEM 250 bomb
-BE 100 bomb
-LPR 122 rocket launcher
-LPR 57 rocket launcher
-PRN 80 rocket launcher
-AA-2 Atoll / R-3S AAM (license-built in Romania as A-91) - only on some IAR-93B only on the J-22
-BL755 cluster bombs
-AGM-65 Maverick TV guided AGM
-AS-7 Kerry / Kh-23 Grom AGM

Avionics

-VHF/UHF air-to-air and air-to-ground radio (20W transmission power)
-gyro unit (Honeywell SGP500 twin-gyro platform in ORAO)
-radio altimeter
-ADF
-radio compass and marker receiver
-IFF (IAR-93B only)
-GEC-Marconi three-axis stability augmentation system, incorporating a basic bank/altitude hold autopilot and emergency wings-level facility




RoflSeal #2 Posted 17 January 2012 - 07:31 AM

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Those are MiG21, look at the size of those tailplanes and tail.

ribbel #3 Posted 17 January 2012 - 03:55 PM

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View PostRoflSeal, on 17 January 2012 - 07:31 AM, said:

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Those are MiG21, look at the size of those tailplanes and tail.

Agree, air-intake in the nose, and long pitot-tube...those are Fishbeds.

Nec Timide, Nec Tumide

RoflSeal #4 Posted 17 January 2012 - 04:06 PM

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and i get a minus for correcting, lol

ribbel #5 Posted 17 January 2012 - 05:46 PM

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Corrected... ;)

Nec Timide, Nec Tumide

Schultz #6 Posted 07 July 2012 - 09:45 PM

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Yes you are right, I checked it also, it seems it was a mistake from were I found the picture. Anyway Romania has most of the jets MIG-21.